Posts Tagged ‘corrective exercise’

“Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the thinks you can think up if only you try!”

– Dr. Seuss

Some experts claim that stretching is a bad idea and they aren’t wrong! If you stretch too much or attempt to stretch without the right goals or proper instruction, it could lead to disastrous outcomes. Most people are unaware of the components of good stretching. Determining goals and learning what type of stretching that works best for you are most important to avoid pain and injury.

Stretching can not only prevent injury but help to promote health and wellness.

Stretching can not only prevent injury but help to promote health and wellness.

The 2 main goals to consider when stretching are whether you want to just prep the muscles for strenuous activity or whether you would like to lengthen the muscles to increase range of motion and improve movement? If you are getting ready for a work out or about to do strenuous activity the type of stretching that would be better suited for you would be Ballistic, which involves bouncing , or a short duration static stretches, which involves holding a stretch for a short period of time. You also want to make sure that you are stretching target muscles that you will be utilizing. If you are looking to improve your range of motion and optimize movement while recorrecting your posture, then you would be more suited to visit a specialist that can help teach you Static, Active Isolated, and/or PNF stretching that would include the proper movements, adequate amounts of pressure and durations, and tips to avoid overstretching.
The idea behind stretching, either for activity prep or for increasing range of motion, is to avoid injury. Stretching increases blood flow to the area which increases localized temperature making the muscle fibers more pliable and easier to reduce muscular tension. The increase in blood flow also brings nutrients to the area that assists in the recovery of muscle tissue from activity and injury. With benefits like that, it should be an easy choice that stretching is a good move, but remember to stretch smart and stretch well. Always remember to seek professional advice on stretching from professionals such as chiropractors, massage therapist, personal trainers, and rehab specialists!

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“Correction does much, but encouragement does more.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Exercise is one of the most beneficial activities that we can do for our health and wellness, but yet we see so many people avoid this task that seems dreadful to them. There are many reasons that top the list of  why people don’t want to exercise including not enough time, boredom, pain, but most importantly people don’t really know how to do exercises properly.

Corrective exercises are exercises that are designed to not only regain proper movement but maintain proper posture as well. These exercises will create a strong foundation to build stability upon.  It is after a client has mastered the corrective exercises that they can move on to functional exercises that will help the client to move, feel, and be better.

If you would like to learn more about corrective exercising, listen in to the Healthy U radio show on www.kinetichifi.com this Saturday the 6th from 2-4pm EST. I will be chatting with Justin Price of  Aspire Fitness & Wellness who is a personal trainer specializing in corrective exercising. We will be discussing how to become more educated in corrective exercising and how it can  dramatically benefit your life.

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“Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity.”

– John F. Kennedy

As you have read in a previous post, I have been investing a lot of time in studying for my Certified Personal Trainer’s program. This is a journey that started back in 2005 when if first took the CEU program from the NCSF (National Council for Strength & Fitness). Interest in this program arose because of the amount of clientele coming in to see me that were experiencing significant pain after starting a new exercise program. Most of these clients were following regiments prescribed by a  personal trainer. This concept didn’t make much sense to me because of the fact that, in my opinion, trainers were suppose to keep you safe while reaching your goals. It was shortly after this that I decided to observe several trainers as they were training clients at the gym I was working out at and noticed how a majority of them were using too much weight for their clients and not even paying attention to their form. In addition to this, I learned that most trainers in the Charleston area received their certification from a weekend online course. These findings were shocking to me, so I wanted to become more educated about the training process and how to properly execute a training program that would be safe and effective.

Back in 2005 I completed the continuing education program from the NCSF to attain the required CEUs to recertify my Massage Therapy license. I had no intention on taking the CPT (Certified Personal Trainer) exam at that time due to the fact that I wanted to focus myself on developing my massage therapy skills and not jump into a new endeavor. It wasn’t until about a year ago that I started utilizing movement pattern training as  part of my teachings to my clients to make sure that their form, while working out, wasn’t compromising their posture and distorting their muscular balance. Unfortunately, many people considered the movement patterns as ‘exercises’ and labeled them as such. Exercise instruction is outside the normal “Scope of Practice” for a  massage therapist. A Scope of Practice can be broadened with proper continued education and it was with this concept that I decided to begin my studying to achieve my Personal Trainer’s certification.

On August 16, 2012 I took my CPT exam and I am very pleased to announce that I passed and am now a certified personal trainer through the NCSF. I still have no intention on working as a personal trainer in a gym,  but this allows me to legitimately instruct corrective exercises to my clients. This aspect of my treatments will further the benefits of the work I  provide. Therapeutic massage has many benefits including breaking down muscular adhesions and scar tissue as well as re-aligning posture. Corrective Exercises allow those benefits to last longer between sessions and also provide the client with a sense of accomplishment as they are assuming a larger part of their self-maintenance in their health and wellness.
I urge people to add an element of fitness and exercise to their regular healthcare program because of the many positive benefits on the body overall. What exercises and how to do them properly are not always the easiest tasks to understand, so I highly recommend seeking the knowledge of well trained professionals. This will ensure your safety  and improve your health,  as well as help you maintain your overall wellness.