Archive for the ‘Sports’ Category

“Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity.”

– John F. Kennedy

As you have read in a previous post, I have been investing a lot of time in studying for my Certified Personal Trainer’s program. This is a journey that started back in 2005 when if first took the CEU program from the NCSF (National Council for Strength & Fitness). Interest in this program arose because of the amount of clientele coming in to see me that were experiencing significant pain after starting a new exercise program. Most of these clients were following regiments prescribed by a  personal trainer. This concept didn’t make much sense to me because of the fact that, in my opinion, trainers were suppose to keep you safe while reaching your goals. It was shortly after this that I decided to observe several trainers as they were training clients at the gym I was working out at and noticed how a majority of them were using too much weight for their clients and not even paying attention to their form. In addition to this, I learned that most trainers in the Charleston area received their certification from a weekend online course. These findings were shocking to me, so I wanted to become more educated about the training process and how to properly execute a training program that would be safe and effective.

Back in 2005 I completed the continuing education program from the NCSF to attain the required CEUs to recertify my Massage Therapy license. I had no intention on taking the CPT (Certified Personal Trainer) exam at that time due to the fact that I wanted to focus myself on developing my massage therapy skills and not jump into a new endeavor. It wasn’t until about a year ago that I started utilizing movement pattern training as  part of my teachings to my clients to make sure that their form, while working out, wasn’t compromising their posture and distorting their muscular balance. Unfortunately, many people considered the movement patterns as ‘exercises’ and labeled them as such. Exercise instruction is outside the normal “Scope of Practice” for a  massage therapist. A Scope of Practice can be broadened with proper continued education and it was with this concept that I decided to begin my studying to achieve my Personal Trainer’s certification.

On August 16, 2012 I took my CPT exam and I am very pleased to announce that I passed and am now a certified personal trainer through the NCSF. I still have no intention on working as a personal trainer in a gym,  but this allows me to legitimately instruct corrective exercises to my clients. This aspect of my treatments will further the benefits of the work I  provide. Therapeutic massage has many benefits including breaking down muscular adhesions and scar tissue as well as re-aligning posture. Corrective Exercises allow those benefits to last longer between sessions and also provide the client with a sense of accomplishment as they are assuming a larger part of their self-maintenance in their health and wellness.
I urge people to add an element of fitness and exercise to their regular healthcare program because of the many positive benefits on the body overall. What exercises and how to do them properly are not always the easiest tasks to understand, so I highly recommend seeking the knowledge of well trained professionals. This will ensure your safety  and improve your health,  as well as help you maintain your overall wellness.

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Beach weather is finally upon us and you know what that means, everyone wants to get their best beach body in shape and ready to head out. What this means for most is heading back in to the gym and for others it’s and increase in their workout. Either way, this can put a tremendous amount of stress on your body to the point it can cause pain and discomfort as well as limiting your ability and desire to keep up with your workouts. The most important part of a workout is the Recovery! The above Blog supplies you with 9 great ideas to help with your post-workout recovery. Follow this tips so that you can keep up with your workouts and so that you can move, feel, & BE better!

Pay close attention to #4 and #6! If you have any further questions, please feel free to comment or contact DEFINED: Therapeutic Massage (http://www.definedmassage.com)

Happy Training!

ChiroHealthWellness's Blog

So, you have finally dragged yourself to the gym; you eked out more sit-ups, push-ups, and miles today than you have in the past 5 years, and now you are exhausted, but you want to keep up your new workout regimen.  Recovery after exercise is essential to muscle and tissue repair and strength building.  A muscle needs anywhere from 24-48 hours after a workout to repair and rebuild, especially after a strength workout.  If recovery is not taken, a muscle simply will start to break down instead of build.  Here are 9 ways to make the most of your recovery hours that will keep the muscle soreness at a minimum, boost your energy level, and make your fitness goals a reality:

 

1.                  Rest.  Rest is one of the best ways to heal from illness, injury, and even from a tough workout.  So, kick off your shoes, sit back…

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Over my career I have had the opportunity to work with many sports of which I study the movement patterns needed for each specific sport. As a Sports Massage Therapist, one on the most important responsibilities is to identify postural imbalances and what muscles are limiting full range of motion that  would impede the needed movement patterns to be successful.  The next step is to treat the limiting muscles with appropriate flexibility training and therapeutic massage to restore and optimize the proper movement patterns that will improve the athlete’s performance and better achieve their goals.

One sport in particular holds a special place in my heart and that is wrestling. In my high school years, I wrestled for 4 years and because  of that I understand the needs, desires, and movement patterns better than any other sport. Recently, I have been asked back to my Alma Mater to utilize my skills to help the wrestlers recover quicker and improve their performance. I look at two main things that produce challenges for proper movement patterns for these wrestlers; posture and joint range of motion.

Next to Gymnastics and Dancing, I believe wrestlers have the greatest need for proper posture and increased flexibility. If a wrestler has poor posture it will lead to an unfavorable stance making it more difficult to both defend and attack as well as making it easier for the opponent to overcome and score. When a wrestler has limits in their joint range of motion, not only will it be difficult to get in to a solid stance, but it makes it much more difficult to execute moves as well as increasing their chances for injury. If the wrestler sustains a severe enough injury, it calls from immediate removal from competition which adds and unwanted amount of psychological stress that can further effect their performance. How do we easily avoid situations like these? Identify the main culprit; tight unconditioned muscles.

Treating tight muscles to release adhesions and increase flexibility of the muscle fibers will in turn lead to smother movement because of less restrictions and scar tissue that  cause muscle to “stick”.  Treatment will also increase recovery because as muscle tissue becomes looser,  blood flow increases to the local area and it is in the blood where nutrients responsible for recovery are held. Performance is also increased due to proper treatment because as you add the previous results, when there less pain then there is less physical and psychological limitations.

The amazing part of treatment like the treatment that  I use with the wrestlers is that it can be applied to any sport! The only aspect that  has to be modified is that the intention has to be shifted to the specific needs of the  restrictions to movement patterns for the specific sport being assessed.