Pain: Now You Feel It, Now You Don’t

Posted: February 9, 2012 in Health & Wellness, Massage Therapy
Tags: , , ,

“The greatest evil is physical pain.”
Sa
int Augustine


Have you ever found a bruise, cut, or even abrasion on your body and don’t know how it got there? Maybe you have had a massage in the past and your therapist worked on an area that you didn’t think was sore until there was pressure applied? For some this happens quite often, but why is it that we can avoid pain so easily sometimes, but other times we can’t?

    When we get injured or hurt there is a stimulus, the thing is, is that stimulus has to be strong enough to illicit a response from our nervous system. On the downside if the stimulus is too much, not only do we feel pain but our body responds by shutting down the injured area so that we don’t feel the pain anymore. Good thing right?! Not necessarily. If the area isn’t rehabilitated properly then the nerve signals stay shut off or distorted causing compensatory patterns to our muscles.
    Compensatory patterns are when the body recruits nearby muscles to assist with the movement and duties of the injured area and muscles. For the short term this is a good thing because it allows to injured area to start the repair process, but if left untreated and properly rehabilitated it will continue to hide the pain and cause an overload of work to the recruited muscles. The overload on the muscles will cause pain and additional recruitment and so on and so forth. You can see how this cycle can repeat until the body is in disarray.
    Just as you would go to your dentist for a check-up to find cavities or other issues that you can’t see or feel on your own, a licensed massage therapist is trained to find the imbalances in muscle tone and assist return proper posture and muscle tone. This is yet another benefit of regular visits to your massage therapist!
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